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Categories: Business;Office 365
Description: First view on Microsoft Forms - the new Office 365 application to create surveys and questionaires.
Custom forms are one of the features that have been demanded by enterprises since the early days of SharePoint. Microsoft used to address this demand by leveraging InfoPath, and many organizations built their custom forms based on this technology. Recently, Microsoft announced that they are going to improve PowerApps to become an additional custom forms application. The benefits of creating a custom form with PowerApps are obvious. PowerApps is a no-code solution to create Mobile Applications. Custom forms created in PowerApps use the same technology and will be responsive out-of-the-box. But now there is a new kid in town Microsoft Forms. The name is confusing, as Microsoft Forms is not another custom forms application, but an application that can be used to create surveys and questionnaires based on custom forms. Microsoft Forms is a new addition to the Office 365 family of applications and can be accessed using this URL https//forms.office.com Let's have a look at what users can do with Microsoft Forms. The editor in Microsoft Forms is a very basic editor. It allows to create a form showing a question and offers a list of answers. Microsoft Forms offers four different ways to create a question Choice Create a question and offer pre-canned answers as list of choices Text Create a question and allow participants to fill in their answer Rating Create a question and allow participants to provide a rating (5 stars or number) Date Create a question and allow participants to provide a date (great for scheduling appointments) Microsoft Forms also offers additional settings to configure who can fill out a survey and options for responses. Let's create a little example to see how this works I have created a single question questionnaire which offers five pre-canned answers. This is what my question looks like within the editor And this is the preview of my form as it gets published to participants Now that I have created my little survey, I want to publish it within an organization. To do this, I simply need to click on the Share button which is located in the upper right corner of the Microsoft Forms editor. This is what the 'Share' dialogue looks like I can share my survey with coworkers in my organization only, or I can choose to send a link to my survey to people outside of my organization as well. This is an exciting option as it allows for creating truly anonymous surveys. I decided to send a link to my survey to external users as well. This is what my survey looks like to the authenticated user Microsoft Forms not only offers an editor to create new surveys, but it also allows you to evaluate the responses. To have a look at the responses, I log in to Microsoft Forms again, open my survey and click on ‘Responses’. This is what the responses on my survey look like This overview shows, that I got two responses and that it takes about one minute to answer my survey. To have a closer look at the results, I can click on the 'View results' button. I answered my survey twice. I used my Office 365 login, and that's why I show up here with my name. You can also see, that an anonymous user answered my survey as well. I did that by opening the link to my survey in an 'in-private' browser instance. In addition, you can have a look at the answers of each user by selecting a user in the Responder dropdown at the gray area at the top. To continue with a more detailed evaluation of the responses, you can even export all responses to an Excel sheet. Microsoft Forms is a new application, and it might not be available to all tenants yet. With Microsoft Forms, users can create surveys and questionnaires very easily, and now users can even create anonymous surveys which isn't possible with SharePoint. I think Microsoft Forms is a great addition to the Office 365 and I'm sure Microsoft will add additional features to Forms in the future.




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Categories: Business;Office 365;SharePoint
Description: This blog post explains, how to configure Supervision in SharePoint online and it shows, how Supervision works for the user and the reviewer.
Many organizations of different sizes and industries use Office 365 and this number is constantly growing. Office 365 and SharePoint online are a huge success for Microsoft especially in a professional environment, however, enterprises have specific requirements when it comes to governance and auditing that needs to be addressed by Microsoft. One of these specific requirements is the Supervision feature which is available in SharePoint online. With Supervision, companies can audit inbound and outbound communications and check if the communication is compliant with governance policies. Let's have a look on how to configure Supervision policies and how they work. To be able to create a new Supervision policy, an admin (Supervisory Review Administrator role) needs to navigate to the Office 365 admin center and click on "Security & Compliance". In the "Data Governance" section, click on "Supervision" to get to the landing page. On the Landing page, existing policies will be shown, new policies can be created, and existing policies can be updated. Let's continue with creating a new Supervision policy which is a multi-stage process. In the first step, I need to provide a name and a description for the new policy. In the next step, I need to provide the account I want to audit. This can be a single user or a group of users. In my example, I will use a single user. If you chose a group to supervise, you could explicitly exclude group members from being supervised. In the third step of this process, you can specify what kind of communication should be supervised (options are inbound, outbound or internal) and you can specify conditions that act as a filter. In my basic example, I want to supervise inbound and outbound communication that contains the word "Softlanding". I click on "Add a condition" and choose "Message contains any of these words". In the fourth step, I can define the percentage of communications that should be reviewed. In my basic example, I will change the value to 100%, but in a professional environment, the percentage will be most likely between 5% and 10% (or even less than 5%). In the last step of this process, I need to specify the reviewers. In my example, I'm using a single user account as a reviewer, but in a professional environment it makes sense to specify a group of users as reviewers. At the end of this process, a summary of the new policy is shown. This summary allows you to go back to a specific step and change the settings. After clicking on Finish, the new policy will show up on the landing page, and it will be in effect almost immediately. Let's see how SharePoint Supervision is working. In my example, I will send an email from my Softlanding account to the account in my demo tenant who is now being supervised. This email will contain the word "Softlanding" to ensure, that the new policy gets triggered. The email will be sent to the mailbox of the demo user as a regular email. The addressee will not get any kind of notification that this email is about to be supervised. The supervision process is totally transparent to any user being supervised. To be able to review an email, the reviewer needs to navigate to the Outlook web application. Supervision support for Outlook 2016 will be available soon. The Outlook web application of each reviewer will get an additional section which shows up in the left navigation pane of the Outlook web application. This new section (which technically is a link to an additional mailbox) shows the name of the Supervision Policy (in my example I named the policy "Demo"). In the above screenshot, you can see that there is one email waiting to be reviewed. In fact, this is the email I just sent from my Softlanding account to the demo user. A closer look at the email shows that there is an additional section called "Supervisory Review". I marked this section in red in the above screen shot. This section is only visible to the reviewers. A click on this new section shows the options that reviewers have to categorize this email. Reviewers can categorize this email, and they even can add a comment to this email. A classification can be changed at any time. Changes to the classification will be maintained in a History that can be looked at by clicking on "History" just below "Classification" on the left (blue) navigation bar. With Supervision, enterprises can review the communication between internal accounts or between internal accounts and external accounts. This can be helpful during a training phase or to improve the support quality of a service team. Supervision is transparent to regular users and does not effect sending or receiving emails in any way, which stops Supervision from being a security feature.




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Categories: Business;Office 365;SharePoint
Description:
​Cloud storage has become very popular in the recent years and many users are utilizing one of the various cloud storage providers (like DropBox, Google Drive or Microsoft OneDrive) to share documents, pictures or video files with friends or family members. Although this is very convenient in a private environment, it quickly becomes a potential security issue when used in a professional environment. In many enterprises employees have the requirement to share documents with external users – like the employees of a subcontractor. If a company does not provide options on how to share documents with externals, employees can be creative to find ways how to share documents with externals. Often these alternative ways of sharing cannot be controlled by the enterprise – like the private DropBox account of an employee. If there is a verified requirement to share documents with externals, it's much better in terms of security and compliance, to offer a controlled and secure way to share documents with external users – and this is when OneDrive for Business comes into play. The major advantage of OneDrive for Business versus other cloud storage providers (like DropBox or Google Drive) is, that it is integrated within Office 365 and that it can be configured by using its own admin center, which is integrated within the Office 365 admin centers. Let's open the OneDrive for Business admin center and have a look on the options enterprises have, to control and configure external sharing within Office 365. The following screenshot shows all option in terms of sharing. At the top, there is the option to enable or to disable external sharing. If external sharing gets enabled, there are additional options that are used to finetune external sharing. If external sharing needs to be limited to specific domains (like the domain of a sub-contractor), there is a setting that allows admins to whitelist or blacklist specific domains. OneDrive for Business is using a new Sharing experience that offers additional options controlling how a document is shared. This is how this new experience looks like Some of the options that this new dialogue is offering, can be controlled from within the OneDrive Admin Center. If a document is shared by providing a hyperlink, an expiry date can be set to limit access to a file for a specific period only. The new OneDrive for Business admin center not only offers options for enterprises to control external sharing, there is also an option to apply compliance rules like Data-loss-prevention policies. The new OneDrive for Business admin center allows enterprises to finetune options regarding external sharing. Soon it will even be possible to limit sharing to a specific group of users. With the new OneDrive for Business sharing experience and the versatile options to configure the use of OneDrive for Business in an enterprise, enterprises can provide a controlled and secure way of sharing content to their users – which will make it far less attractive for users to look for alternative ways to share content!




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Categories: Business;Office 365
Description:
​Microsoft Teams is a great application for teams to collaborate. In contrast to Office Groups, Microsoft Teams is a chat-based collaboration application, which means that quick and easy exchange of short messages is the major feature in Microsoft Teams that drives collaboration. The chat engine which is used by Microsoft Teams is offering some great features to make chatting efficient and fun simultaneously. One of those cool features is how uploaded files are managed. To see how Microsoft Teams is dealing with files that got uploaded to a chat, let's first have a closer look on how to best organize multiple chats. A heavily used chat stream can get confusing if team members are discussing multiple topics in a single chat stream. That's the reason why Microsoft Teams is offering channels. With channels, chats can be organized by topic. To create a new channel, just click on the three little dots on the right side of the team name and select "Add channel" in the context menu. Each channel needs to have a unique name and (that's my recommendation) a meaningful description. Once the new channel has been created, the team can start to use this new channel immediately. One of the cool features I like is the ability to add files to a chat. Let's assume there is a channel "Sales support" and a team member is uploading a file with the current sales activities. Members of this chat are now able to open the file or to download it by clicking on the three ellipses shown to the right of the filename. However, the most important question is where is this file actually saved to? To understand, how the underlying chat engine is dealing with uploaded files, let's have a look at the top of the client area. Right next to 'Conversations' there is an additional tab called 'Files'. If you click on the 'Files' tab, a list of files related to the current team is shown. Here we find the file 'Sales Activities' that has been uploaded to the 'Sales support' channel. You'll also notice, that the name of the channel is mentioned in the headline as well. This files overview lists all the files that are belonging to the current channel. If you have worked with Microsoft Teams before, you might know, that Microsoft Teams is utilizing a SharePoint document library under the hood to save files to. Let's see how this is looking like if you are using channels. In the navigation bar just below of the name of the current channel, I click on 'Open in SharePoint'. A new tab is opened in my browser showing the document library that is used by the current team. You'll notice that there is a folder with the name of the channel I have just created. This shows that files belonging to a chat channel are saved to a folder with the name of the channel. When clicking on the folder ‘Sales support’, this folder gets opened and displays the file that has been attached to the chat previously. Saving files that get uploaded to a chat to a folder in a document library has many advantages. All members of the team can access the most recent version of the file, because it is saved to a single location – in contrast to sharing a file via email. The team members can collaborate on the file by using Co-Authoring and if the file gets shared with others, the security policies and the data-loss-prevention rules applied by the organization are in effect. Many external online services are offering chats these days to enable users to exchange short messages in an informal manner. Chats are usually adopted by users very quickly because most users like the straightforward way of exchanging information. Microsoft Teams is going far beyond that approach by adding security and compliance features to their chat to make it a valuable option for organizations with dedicated security and compliance requirements.




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Categories: Azure;Business;Exchange;System Center;Office 365
Description: The battle against WannaCry ransomware will continue to happen without proper defense and protection. Here are five ways to protect yourself from WannaCry and future malware attacks.
Over the past three years, ransomware has jumped into the spotlight as a means to exploit and infect valuable data assets and demand a ransom for release. To date, hundreds of thousands of computers in 150 countries have been crippled by the "weapon of mass destruction", WannaCry, and the number keeps on growing. To stop your organization from becoming affected, and to protect yourself from future attacks, here's 5 ways to protect yourself from malware attacks. Prepare and Patch ​It's crazy to think that the patch that prevented the WannaCry infection, released two months ago in March, could have resolved the thousands of computers infected if proactively patched. It is quite evident that the first way to protect your organization is to ​​Patch aggressively to eliminate vulnerabilities. ​Upgrade to a supported version of Microsoft OS​. With Windows 10 as the most secure OS available, the time to upgrade from unsupported systems Window XP, Server and soon to be Windows 8, is now.Assess your Backup and Disaster Recovery Strategy Do you have a data remediation strategy? How often do you test your replication and failover to ensure that your data is safe. When was your data last updated? Having a proper disaster recovery and backup strategy is the best way to side-step ransom payments by restoring your company's data from a reliable backup resource. Examine your RPOs and RTOs to confirm all data is up-to-date and backed up as frequently as possible.​ Follow the 3-2-1 principle Store at least three copies of your data on two different media, with at least one copy siting off-site - like tape, offline disk or the cloud. With Backup in the Azure Cloud - companies can find a cheaper alternative for a backup solution without the costs of hardware and depreciating assets. Azure backup maintains six copies of your data across two Azure datacenters to ensure 99.9% service availability for full peace-of-mind.​ ​​Learn more about our Managed and Unified Data Protection Services ​​Detection Use threat intelligence sources to block or alert you of the presence of anomalies in your network traffic.​With most suspicious activity coming from phishing emails, screen your Exchange emails with Microsoft Advanced Threat Protection. Learn more about our $1000 funded, Advanced Email Protection FastTrack, where we can help your organization deploy Advanced Threat Protection to secure your mailboxes from threats and malicious links.​Limit Access ​There are two kinds of user accounts on Windows. Administrator accounts can install, update and remove software, and malware that infects an administrator account can do so as well. Limited accounts, however, are barred from altering a computer's software installations, and in most cases, malware that infected limited accounts will be similarly crippled.​ With that said ​Dialing back the degree of access privileges. Unfortunately, Windows creates administrator accounts by default. So go into Control Panel > User Accounts > Manage User Accounts and create a limitedaccount​t for every person who uses your PC, including yourself Use the administrator account for only updating, adding or removing software.​​Ensure you're Protected Contact your Softlanding​ representative or call +1 (604) 697 6763​ to assess the security readiness of your organization. We would be happy to work with you to assess your current practices, procedures and technical controls in alignment with ISO 27002 standards. ​Learn more about our ISO 27002 Security Assessment​




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Categories: Office 365;SharePoint
Description: How to overcome the list view threshold in SharePoint online by using indexed columns.
​If you add more than 5000 items to a list or library in SharePoint online, you are faced with this error message Unfortunately, this list view threshold can't be changed in SharePoint online, but there are options to overcome this limitation. If you use Bing (or Google) to look for options, you will probably find this article published by Microsoft. It highlights some options to manage large lists (with more than 5000 items) in SharePoint online. One of those options is to create a view using an indexed column as a filter. Because I used this option in one of my recent projects to overcome the list view threshold in SharePoint online, I created this blog post to share my findings. SharePoint online saves all the data in a SQL Server database. One option to improve the performance and to reduce the CPU load while retrieving items is to use indexed columns. I guess Microsoft suggested to use views with indexed columns to overcome the list view threshold because of that reason. Let's have a look on how to create an indexed column first before I continue with setting up a view. To create an indexed column, you need to navigate to the list settings first. On the settings page look for the list of columns. At the bottom of the list of columns, you'll find the link 'Indexed Columns'. If you click on this link, you'll get to the list of indexed columns. Here new indexed columns can be created, but keep in mind the number of indexed columns is limited to 20 per list. In addition, not all of the existing columns can be used as indexed columns. The following table is providing detailsSupported Column TypesUnsupported Column TypesSingle line of textMultiple lines of textNumberHyperlink/PictureCurrencyAny custom field typeDateTimeCalculated fieldChoice filed (single value only)Multi-value choice fieldLookup (single value only)Multi-value lookup fieldPerson/Group (single value only)External dataManaged Metadata Here is one thing I would like to note from my personal experience, creating an indexed column based on a lookup field does not help in terms of overcoming the list view threshold. My recommendation is to replace Choice fields with managed metadata fields which will also enhance the maintainability of the data. After an indexed column has been created, it can't be used right away. It usually takes some time for SharePoint online to propagate the changes to the underlying SQL server database. If you are creating a new indexed column because you want to fix an issue with a list that has already hit the 5000 items list view threshold, then this won't work! As creating an indexed column requires SharePoint online to 'touch' every single item in the list, the list view threshold will be hit again while the index gets created, which will stop the process internally. You'll end up thinking the index has been created, but it hasn't. If you need to create an indexed column for a list that has already hit the list view threshold, you need to create an empty list first, create all the indexed columns and when SharePoint online is done with that, copy the items to the list. This is the only way I know to create an indexed column for a list that has more than 5000 items. Let's continue with creating a basic view. For this blog post, I'm creating a basic view that is using the indexed ID column to create a filter as this column is an indexed column by default. The following screenshot shows that a view based on an indexed column is able to show more than 5000 items. Let's continue with adding a sort to the view I have just created. The following screenshot show that I just added the 'End Date' column as a sorting parameter to the view. I want the view to display the items with the most recent end date first. But if I use this view, SharePoint online displays the odd error message again. Why, the view worked before, didn't it? The answer is easy! Yes, the view worked perfectly as long as it was just using the indexed column. Things changed when I added an additional column to sort the list items. This will add an additional column to the internal query SharePoint online is using to retrieve items. As this additional column is not an indexed column yet, we are hitting the 5000 item list view threshold again. Lessons learned if you want to use indexed columns to overcome the 5000 items list view threshold, you need to keep the following in mind You can only have 20 indexed columns per list. Plan thoughtfully! You can't create an indexed column if the list is already hitting the list view threshold. If you use additional sorting in a view, the sort column also needs to be an indexed column. Review the list items and check if some can be deleted or archived to another list. Although I understand why Microsoft implemented this list view threshold in SharePoint online many years ago, I don't think it is really needed anymore. Today's hardware and modern data centers should be robust enough to allow tenants to have lists with more than 5000 items. I wouldn't be too surprised if we would see changes in terms of the list view threshold in the near future. Update Unfortunately there is another limitation I wasn't aware of. This is what I found out "When you create a filtered view, make sure the first indexed column in the filter expression does not exceed the List View Threshold. SharePoint selects the first indexed column in a query. Other columns you specify in the view filter may or may not be indexed, but the view does not use those indexes, even if the result of the filtered view returns less than the List View Threshold." (https//support.office.com/en-us/article/Manage-large-lists-and-libraries-in-SharePoint-b8588dae-9387-48c2-9248-c24122f07c59). To me this means that even with indexed columns there is no viable way how to overcome the list view threshold in SharePoint online! Here is the PowerShell script I used to create list items automatically (I used an additional number field 'LVTNumber') # Add references to SharePoint client assemblies and authenticate to Office 365 site - required for CSOM Add-Type -Path “C\Program Files\Common Files\microsoft shared\Web Server Extensions\15\ISAPI\Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.dll” Add-Type -Path “C\Program Files\Common Files\microsoft shared\Web Server Extensions\15\ISAPI\Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Runtime.dll” Add-Type -Path “C\Program Files\Common Files\microsoft shared\Web Server Extensions\15\ISAPI\Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.WorkflowServices.dll” # Specify tenant admin and site URL (replace '...' with your settings) $SiteUrl = "..." $ListName = "..." $UserName = "..." $SecurePassword = ConvertTo-SecureString "..." -AsPlainText -Force # Bind to site collection $ClientContext = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.ClientContext($SiteUrl) $credentials = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.SharePointOnlineCredentials($UserName, $SecurePassword) $ClientContext.Credentials = $credentials $ClientContext.ExecuteQuery() # Get the list $List = $ClientContext.Web.Lists.GetByTitle($ListName) $ClientContext.Load($List) $ClientContext.ExecuteQuery() # Loop to create list items for ($i=1; $i -le 10000; $i++) $ListItemCreationInformation = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.ListItemCreationInformation $NewListItem = $List.AddItem($ListItemCreationInformation) $NewListItem["Title"] = "LVTTest_$($i)" $NewListItem["LVTNumber"] = $i; $NewListItem.Update() $ClientContext.ExecuteQuery() write-host "Item created LVTTest_$($i)" write-host "Script finished!"




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Categories: Business;Office 365;SharePoint
Description: This blog post describes how to use calendar overlays in SharePoint
​Calendars are very popular in SharePoint. They get added to many sites and subsites in various SharePoint portals, especially to team and project sites. Although calendars are widely used in SharePoint, not many site owners spend time planning how to use them. I often see subsites with a single calendar crammed with many appointments of different kinds. My usual recommendation is to use one calendar for each type of appointment, but when suggesting this improvement, many site owners are afraid it may affect usability. This is where calendar overlays come into play. What are calendar overlays in SharePoint? In a nutshell, with calendar overlays, you can merge multiple calendar views. Those additional views can come from different calendars or from just one calendar. Each overlaid calendar can be displayed in a different color. How can overlaid calendars be used in SharePoint? I see two typical use cases for calendar overlays in SharePoint. The first one is to aggregate appointments from multiple calendars into a single view. Here is an example a marketing team uses one calendar for vacations, another for stat holidays and a third calendar for managing events. With overlaid calendars, the event planning will become much easier as holidays and vacations are superimposed on the events calendar, even though they are managed in different calendars. The second use case is the popular color coding with different types of events being displayed using different colors. This can be achieved by creating a view for each type of appointment, even if only one calendar is used. Overlaying these views will result in a single calendar view displaying different types of appointments in different colors. How are calendar overlays created? Let me show you this by using an example you can recreate in your environment easily. In my demo, I have a subsite with three calendars, a primary calendar, a calendar listing stat holidays and a calendar for vacation requests. I would like to superimpose the calendar with the stat holidays and the vacation calendar on the main calendar. Both calendars are providing a calendar view called 'All Items'. Before I continue with some screenshots, I should mention that calendar overlays only work with calendar views. List views cannot be overlaid. In my example, I have added Easter Sunday to the stat holidays calendar and a vacation request to the vacation calendar. To create the overlays, I turn to the primary calendar, open the ribbon and select 'Calendar Overlays' The following dialogue shows up, and I click on the ‘New Calendar’ link I create a new calendar overlay for vacations as shown in the next screenshot (don’t forget to click on ‘Resolve’ to be able to select an additional calendar list) I repeat this step with the stat holidays calendar. After I have done that, the list of overlaid calendars looks like this Let's switch back to the primary calendar and see what the overlaid calendars look like Here you can see that the view from the vacation calendar (red) is added to the primary calendar and the view from the stat holiday calendar shows up in green. Keep in mind that both appointments are NOT part of the primary calendar. They are still managed in their own calendars. On the left side, SharePoint shows a legend explaining which calendar is displayed and in what color. To navigate to one of the overlaid calendars, click on the calendar name in the left navigation. As you can see, it just takes a little additional configuration, to create calendar overlays which improve usability and maintainability. That's why calendar overlays are my hidden gems in SharePoint.




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Categories: Business;Office 365;SharePoint
Description: Migrating content and configuration from SharePoint 2007 to SharePoint online can be done, but there are some important things to consider. This blog post provides my recommendations and outlines important topics which need to be considered before starting the migration.
​Although Microsoft released SharePoint 2016 many months ago, there are still some companies out there which are using older SharePoint versions (like SharePoint 2007 or SharePoint 2010). A SharePoint migration from an older version of SharePoint (like SharePoint 2010 or SharePoint 2007) to an up-to-date version of SharePoint (like SharePoint 2016 or SharePoint online) is not an extraordinary process. If content from an older version of SharePoint is to be migrated to SharePoint online, there are some things that should be considered, before starting the migration. 1. Pre-Migration Assessment Although a pre-migration assessment usually is an important part of the pre-migration planning, it becomes more important, if content from an older version of SharePoint needs to be migrated. A pre-migration assessment is helpful to find out if the selected migration tool can migrate content and settings faultlessly. Usually, the log files of a pre-migration assessment provide valuable hints which list, library, or web part might cause problems during the migration. I recommend doing a pre-migration assessment as it is needed to plan the migration process thoroughly. 2. Review site and subsite structure With SharePoint 2007 it was common to create the site structure similar to the structure of the organization. In other words the site structure in SharePoint was reflecting the organization's structure one to one. At that time this was the usual approach, but today a site structure does not reflect the structure of the organization anymore. Instead, structures are reflecting internal procedures or are focusing on department-comprehensive projects. In other words today's site structures are user-centric and are based on processes and internal collaboration rather than copying the internal structure of an enterprise. That's the reason why the site structure of an older SharePoint farm needs to be reviewed very thoroughly. In most cases, it makes sense to create a kind of mapping table for sites and subsites. This mapping table lists all the sites and subsites in the old portal and describes how this translates to the new site structure in SharePoint online. 3. Review existing business applications Although SharePoint 2007 was not used as a platform for integrated business applications like newer versions of SharePoint, many companies created what I like to call 'Mini Applications'. Those mini applications are not based on custom code, but on joined lists with lookup fields, content types, and sometimes calculated fields. Some enterprises created very complex structures by just using multiple generic lists which are joined by lookup fields. The problem with that kind of applications is, that they have been used for many years and that employees have become accustomed to them. While these applications can be migrated to SharePoint without major issues, it makes sense to check, if these applications can be updated or modernized before migrating them. Sometimes a SharePoint-hosted add-in (which wasn't available to previous versions of SharePoint) can be used to replace some functionality and to improve the usability. If a mini application is frequently used, it can be beneficial to rethink its internal structure and use-case to see if it can be replaced by a SharePoint-hosted add-in or a Provider-hosted add-in. 4. Review branding If you compare the out-of-the-box branding of SharePoint online with the out-of-the-box branding of SharePoint 2007, you'll notice a huge difference - and that's true for the user interface as well. If a company has invested a significant effort in creating a corporate SharePoint branding and wishes to migrate this, it will be problematic. Due to the massive changes in SharePoint online compared to SharePoint 2007, an old SharePoint 2007 branding can't be migrated to SharePoint online completely. My recommendation is to take the old SharePoint 2007 branding as a basis and create a new corporate branding for SharePoint online which is adapting the modern user interface of SharePoint online in a beneficial way but still looks similar to the old branding. 5. Review the size of lists and libraries At the times when SharePoint 2007 was popular, there was no such thing as a 5000-items limit like it exists in SharePoint online today. As a result many enterprises created generic lists which contained over 5000 items, which resulted in a decreased performance, but still worked. While these large lists can be migrated to SharePoint online, problems will occur as soon as these lists have been migrated to SharePoint online. If a view is returning more than 5000 items, SharePoint online is displaying an error message. If there are lists with several thousands of items in the old SharePoint farm, I highly recommend reviewing those lists before migrating them. Sometimes the problems can be solved by creating additional filtered views which are based on indexed columns. Sometimes it makes more sense to split up those large lists into multiple lists based on particular topics or to create annual lists. 6. Plan timelines thoroughly Migrations are usually done with the help of tools (like ShareGate or Metalogix). If these tools are used to migrate content from SharePoint on-premises to SharePoint online, these tools need to utilize the Client-side API which is significantly slower compared to the popular and powerful SharePoint Server-side API. The Client-side API is not the only factor which affects the time needed to migrate content and settings to SharePoint online. The varying performance of Office 365 and the throughput rate of the internet connection used during the migration can also affect the duration of the migration. To get some basic time estimates, a look at the reports of the pre-migration assessment can be helpful as they include information about the amount of data and throughput rates. 7. Prepare user training As I have mentioned earlier, the user interface of SharePoint online has been changed dramatically compared to SharePoint 2007. Although the basic functionality (like adding items to a list or updating the metadata of a document) still exists in SharePoint online, the way that functionality is exposed through the user interface has been changed considerably. Without an aligned user training, the user acceptance of the new SharePoint online portal will suffer significantly simply because the employees feel confused or overwhelmed by the new user-interface.




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Categories: Business;Azure;System Center
Description: After our recent collaboration with Microsoft for their OMS Roadshow Event in Vancouver, it came to our attention that road to adopting Microsoft's Operations Management + Security Suite isn't quite evident.
​After our recent event with Microsoft for their OMS Roadshow Tour, it came to our attention that road to adopting Microsoft's Operations Management + Security Suite isn't quite evident. In case you're still twiddling your thumbs thinking of how to get started with a cloud-based IT management solution... we have listed the tools and steps you can take get started - even some that are free!Webinars Azure Site Recovery and Backup Demo and Deep Dive Date Thursday, February 16 | 9am-10am PST Host Chris Hall, Azure P-Seller - Softlanding Learn More​ Operations Management Suite (OMS) Demo and Deep Dive Log Analytics and Azure Automation Date Tuesday, February 21 | 930am - 1030am PST Host Chris Stelzer, Azure P-Seller - Softlanding Learn More ---- Workshops/Funded Deployments DPS Vouchers in EA Licenses By leveraging your remaining DPS days within your EA Agreement, your organization can engage in either a workshop or funded deployment with a recognized Microsoft Partner. Need help finding your DPS days? Send us a quick email We can help you find out! Codename Microsoft "OMS Accelerate" Funding Microsoft is incentivizing the Operations Management + Security Suite for organizations looking to leverage Microsoft Partners to assist in their deployment and set-up. We can help you acquire this funding! Let us check if your organization is eligible We can work our Microsoft magic ---- Quick LinksAzure Services by Region OMS Home OMS Learning OMS Pricing Calculator​




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Categories: Office 365;PowerShell;SharePoint
Description: How to activate a hidden feature in SharePoint online
Recently I was faced with an error message in our SharePoint online tenant when trying to activate the Community Site feature. The error message looked like this Site The Site scoped feature being activated has a dependency on hidden Site Collection scoped feature 'FeatureDefinition/15/4326e7fc-f35a-4b0f-927c-36264b0a4cf0' (ID '4326e7fc-f35a-4b0f-927c-36264b0a4cf0'). Hidden features cannot be auto-activated across scopes. There may be one or more visible Site Collection scoped features that auto-activate the dependent hidden feature.​ Obviously, a feature was missing, but the error message did not tell what feature exactly was missing. Only the GUID of the feature was displayed. To solve this problem, the ​SharePoint Online Management Shell can be used. If this helpful shell has not been installed, you can download the installer from this site https//www.microsoft.com/en-ca/download/details.aspx?id=35588​ After the shell has been installed, be sure to run it as an Administrator! To activate a feature by it's feature ID, you can use this script $$programFilesDirectory = [environment]getfolderpath("programfiles") add-type -Path $programFilesDirectory'\SharePoint Online Management Shell\Microsoft.Online.SharePoint.PowerShell\Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.dll' Write-Host 'Enter credentials and site URL' $siteurl = Read-Host "Site Url" $featureGUID = Read-Host "GUID of feature" $username = Read-Host "User Name" $password = Read-Host -AsSecureString "Password" [Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.ClientContext]$ClientContext = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.ClientContext($siteurl) $ClientContext.Credentials = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.SharePointOnlineCredentials($username, $password) $site = $ClientContext.Site; $feature = new-object System.Guid $featureGUID $site.Features.Add($feature, $true, [Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.FeatureDefinitionScope]None); $ClientContext.ExecuteQuery(); Write-Host 'Feature enabled​' Simply copy and paste this script​ to the SharePoint Online Management Shell and run it. Be sure to enter the the site URL, the GUID of the feature and proper credentials. Usually it will take a little time (about 10-15 seconds) for SharePoint online to activate the feature. If you do not get an error message (and see 'Feature enabled'), the feature should have been activated. ​​